Heavyweight Champion

Despite sharing the market with two rivals, Hexindo continues to expand and grow, especially in the niche of large heavy equipment.

By Luis Lady Indez Dominique and Pudji Lestari

The heavy equipment market in Indonesia has long been a three-way battle between a trio of heavyweight companies—the market leader PT United Tractor, owned by Astra International, number two PT Trakindo Utama, owned by billionaire Achmad Hamami, and number three PT Hexindo Adiperkasa, owned by Japan’s Hitachi. Continue reading

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Taking The High Road

The rise of Astra International shows that being a good corporate citizen also makes excellent business sense.

“There is no superman at Astra. We value super teams more than supermen,” says Prijono Sugiarto, president director of PT Astra International. Photos by Ahmad Zamroni

When Prijono Sugiarto, president director of PT Astra International, hands out his card, on the back, in black small letters, it reads “printed on recycled paper.” One of the many differences, some small and some large, that set Astra apart—be it recycled paper for business cards or building dozens of schools in rural communities. As the largest private company in the country by several measures—largest market capitalization, largest profits, largest revenues outside the state firms—Astra is living proof that being a good company doesn’t mean one can’t also be profitable. Continue reading

Built To Last

(This is the another version of Lasting Value, a story about The Hamami family, with additional data from Forbes Indonesia Richest List 2011 and update on ABM Investama plan to become publicly listed company).

The Hamami family. L-R: Mivida, Muki, Met, and Bari. (Photo courtesy of Tiara Marga Trakindo)

Rachmat Mulyana Hamami has just arrived in his working room that morning, June 14. The two-storey high ceilings room is located in the penthouse floor of TMT 1, family owned new office building, which was expanded and completed in 2009. His family business Trakindo is based in Cilandak, a marine compound, build since early 1970s merely because Jakarta’s Governor Ali Sadikin asked his father to build a factory in the area. At the time, he pictures the place as in the middle of nowhere. It takes five years for the company to create lives in its surrounding. Before that happen it provide buses to pick-up their employees. Now the place is crowded. Some of the energy related companies are also there. Continue reading